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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

How to Market a Self-Published book with Local Media

By Penny Sansevieri

When it comes to how to market a self-published book, I have to admit that local media pitching is one of my fun and maybe best-kept secrets. (Not anymore!) Why?

Well, for one, local media . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

AME blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

How Can Book Reviews make you a better writer?

By Penny Sansevieri

Book reviews obviously offer a lot of benefits. Digging into what consumers really want is ideally your goal for becoming the best writer you can be. While some reviewers’ feedback will be something you can’t do anything about, often there’ll be something you can use right away in your marketing strategies now or eventually down the road. . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Author Marketing Experts blog

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Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

Our suggestions to spot “telling” writing in your WIP.

We’ve all heard the admonition “Show, don’t tell.” When we show we are producing better writing that will capture our readers. Showing, instead of telling, lets editors and agents see you are not an amateur.

In spite of hearing the phrase over and over, many writers don’t know how to recognize “telling” writing. Writing that tells analyzes, generalizes, editorializes and summarizes instead of making the writing interactive and sensory for the reader. Naturally, there will be some generalizations and summarization in your writing, but you need to make sure these elements are in the minority, not the majority of your book. You need to show what’s happening so the reader can create in her own mind the picture you, the writer, want to share.

    To locate telling writing look for:
    • Passive sentences. Often passive sentences, especially those with the word was in them, are a tip-off you might be telling instead of showing. The sentence Sally was angry, is telling. Sally’s lips drew down into a thin, taut line, her jaw working side to side, shows us Sally’s anger. We can deduce from the picture that is painted how Sally feels because we know that look.
    • Passages that have very little sensory information. You can tell us the woman smelled good, was sexy, and she knew it, or you can show it by saying John turned to watch her as she strolled between the restaurant tables, her hips swaying like a belly dancer in slow motion. As she neared she tossed her hair behind her shoulder, casting the scent of violets and vanilla in waves toward him. The fragrance made him salivate. Her perfectly manicured nails trailed along his shoulder as she passed by. He shuddered under her touch and she smiled as he looked up at her. Here we know what the woman smells like, how she walks, how John reacts to her and how she reacts to him. Much stronger than just saying she was sexy.
    • “LY” adverbs. ‘LY” adverbs rob sentences of conciseness and force, making your writing weak. Which sounds stronger? The man yelled loudly or The man roared, the sound drowning out the radio. The dog’s tail wagged happily or The dog’s tail wagged in time to his barks as he bounded around the room. The taxi drove very slowly down the street, or The taxi crept at a snail’s pace down the street.

Get the picture? By adding active verbs, sensory information and using fewer “LY” adverbs, you are showing the reader a snapshot of what’s happening.

Here are a few telling phrases. Choose one, or two if you’re ambitious, and see if you can come up with a better picture.

    • skinny lunatic
    • fanatical nun
    • old paper
    • disgruntled employee.
    • frazzled mother.

Share in the comments what you’ve come up with so everyone can see what you created.

Links for our books are on our book page, under the menu at the top of the page or on our Amazon Author Page

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Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

suggestions from Us about ways to keep your characters in turmoil!

We recently came across an old email entitled Instructions for Life. The 45 positive recommendations on the list are meant to help make one’s life better. By turning some of the instructions upside down and we created bad life advice that will keep novel characters in turmoil.

Next time things are going too smoothly with your WIP try throwing one of these in the mix.

    1. Let them believe in love at first sight, but fight it like it can’t exist.
    2. If they make a mistake, don’t let them be too quick to acknowledge it.
    3. Let them fall in love deeply, passionately, and with people they would never choose. They might get hurt, but it’s the only way to live life completely.
    4. Make them fight to keep their values, but make sure they do keep them. No one loves an un-heroic hero.
    5. Remember silence is sometimes the best answer and unanswered questions are always suspect.
    6. Let them dredge up the past; it makes for good conflicts.
    7. Let them read between the lines … a lot. Miscommunication thickens the plot.
    8. Let them slowly discover that not getting what they want is sometimes the best thing that ever happened.
    9. Never let them mind their own business. You can’t get in trouble that way.
    10. Remember that great love and great achievements involve great risks, and make them willing to risk everything to get their goals.

Do you have a favorite trick for keeping your characters in turmoil?

Links for our books are on our book page, under the menu at the top of the page or on our Amazon Author Page

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Spark and Fire

By Courtney Pierce

Sorry to break it to you, but men and women are very different in how they forge relationships, especially in print. I’ve nailed the female side of the equation, but I tend to need serious support when it comes to behavior driven by testosterone. It’s like pushing my chapters into the TSA x-ray machine and waiting to . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Romancing the Genres blog

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Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

Author Sharon Ledwith who shares with us her thoughts about how to decide on what to write.

We’ve all heard it. Zero in on your target audience. Build your author platform according to who you’re writing for. Sage advice for sure. Books without identifiable potential readers do not sell. Let me repeat that. If you don’t have target market in mind—who you gonna call? To avoid creating a manuscript no one wants, successful writers consider who will read the fruits of their labors. They know their market, and that’s who they write for.

One of the most frequent mistakes made by beginner writers—a step above the writer who does not even bother to look at the publisher’s guidelines—is to assume that EVERYONE will enjoy what they write. You have to decide early on what posse you belong with. Pick your tribe, pick your team, pick where you roll.

A great first step toward knowing your readers is learning what they already like. Read what they read. Check book reviews. Go over the bestseller lists. What needs do these books fill? Who are the main characters? What emotions are dealt with in the story? Once done, you can find the parts that appeal to your strengths as a writer and your likes as a person, to make sure that your book is not just another version of a successful series, but rather a fresher, more vibrant work.

Probably the most important rule in writing is to know your readers, but do not become so obsessed with them that they interfere with your writing what you love. Let’s face it most of us start with ideas, not readers. Awareness is the key here. Perhaps the best way to start creating a reader profile is to start with your idea, and go through these series of questions: Who will this interest? Who will this help? Who needs to know this? Who wants to know this? Once you’ve answered those questions, you can start to identify the type of reader who will benefit.

And believe me, if your readers benefit, then you’ll benefit.

Here’s a glimpse of the premises of both my young adult series.

Mysterious Tales from Fairy Falls Teen Psychic Mysteries…

Imagine a teenager possessing a psychic ability and struggling to cope with this freakish power while trying to have a normal life. Now, imagine being uprooted and forced to live in a small tourist town where nothing much ever happens. It’s bores-ville from the get-go.

Welcome to Fairy Falls. Expect the unexpected…

The Last Timekeepers Time Travel Adventures…

Children are the keys to our future. And now, children are the only hope for our past.

Chosen by an Atlantean Magus to be Timekeepers—legendary time travelers sworn to keep history safe from the evil Belial—five classmates are sent into the past to restore balance, and bring order back into the world, one mission at a time.

The Last Timekeepers Time Travel Adventure Series:

The Last Timekeepers and the Dark Secret, Book #2 Buy Links:

MIRROR WORLD PUBLISHING ׀ AMAZON ׀ BARNES & NOBLE ׀

The Last Timekeepers and the Arch of Atlantis, Book #1 Buy Links:

MIRROR WORLD PUBLISHING ׀ AMAZON ׀ BARNES & NOBLE ׀

Legend of the Timekeepers, prequel Buy Links:

MIRROR WORLD PUBLISHING ׀ AMAZON ׀ BARNES & NOBLE ׀

Mysterious Tales from Fairy Falls Teen Psychic Mystery Series:

Lost and Found, Book One Buy Links:

MIRROR WORLD PUBLISHING ׀ AMAZON ׀ BARNES & NOBLE ׀

Blackflies and Blueberries, Book Two Buy Links:

MIRROR WORLD PUBLISHING ׀ AMAZON ׀ BARNES & NOBLE

Sharon Ledwith is the author of the middle-grade/YA time travel series, THE LAST TIMEKEEPERS, and the teen psychic mystery series, MYSTERIOUS TALES FROM FAIRY FALLS. When not writing, researching, or revising, she enjoys reading, exercising, anything arcane, and an occasional dram of scotch. Sharon lives a serene, yet busy life in a southern tourist region of Ontario, Canada, with her hubby, one spoiled yellow Labrador and a moody calico cat.

Learn more about Sharon Ledwith on her website and blog. Stay connected on Facebook and Twitter, and Smashwords. Look up her Amazon Author page for a list of current books. Be sure to check out THE LAST TIMEKEEPERS TIME TRAVEL SERIES Facebook page.

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

World Building: Plants

By Cindy Tomamichel

As a plant person – a gardener, not some sort of cross species mutant – I find it weird that some people wander through the world without seeing plants as individuals. They never ask themselves what it is, and often seem to not even see it as they trudge through a garden bed. I suspect it is a modern thing, for our ancestors relied on an in depth knowledge of plants for their survival. Today? Not so much.

How does this relate to books? Firstly there is . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Cindy Tomamichel’s blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Getting the most out of Your Amazon Author Page

By Penny Sansevieri

We often to complicate the heck out of things, don’t we? But the thing is, the best book marketing doesn’t have to be complicated – stop overthinking how to sell books on Amazon. . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

AME blog

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Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

Caroline Warfield who shares her thoughts on writing plus an excerpt from her new book.

Sometimes you need a change of pace. Returning from a conference two years ago, I recognized an itch to do something different. I had been writing a series of books involving Victorian heroes working in and returning home from the far reaches of the British empire with a heavy dose of history. It was a familiar world with interrelated families and characters that wandered in and out of one another’s books, but it was wearying. They took time to write. Each required research—sometimes a lot. It was time for a change. I don’t know how other writers build new worlds, but this is what happened to me.

As the airplane sped cross country, I realized I wanted to write a Regency series, but what? Nothing about the marriage mart or London society rose to the surface. What did come into focus was a coaching inn, one of those warm, welcoming places. I let that image develop in my mind and eventually a village appeared around it, a river, a bridge, and a road leading uphill toward a manor, the seat of the local aristocratic family. I had begun world building.

Structures and roads, however do not make a world. It needed to populate it with interconnected families. I began to imagine the innkeeper’s sons. The aristocrat on the hill became an earl. Were they friends? Were they rivals? What if one of the innkeeper’s sons was in actuality the natural son of the earl? By the time the plane landed, I had the basics for the Ashmead world.

That’s where my muse left off and craft began. Step one is always character building. I use detailed character questionnaires to develop well rounded character sketches. I need to know their wounds and scars, their goals and talents, their appearance, their obsessions and event their favorite swear words. In this case I also needed to know what they thought of one another and how they related.

Setting comes next. I find contemporary county directories useful for identifying no end of detail: types of businesses, prices, surnames, assembly rooms, and so on. Books on travel from first decades of the 19th century were a rich source as well, especially for inns, and contemporary maps also helped me envision my village and the land around it. Soon I had created a general map of Ashmead on Afon, and a growing list of local folk: the vicar, grocer, physician, beekeeper, tenant farmers, and so on.

After dragging my previous heroes from Canton to Ottawa to Calcutta and back to London, it was a relief to give the new series a cozy home base. Once I know who my people were, and what their village was like, I could begin to think about plot and the conflicts and complexities that would give their stories life.

I’ve created a Facebook Group that provides a guide to the Ashmead people and places for my readers. While this is a work in progress, you can find it under Caroline Warfield’s Fellow Travelers .

About the Series, The Ashmead Heirs
When the Earl of Clarion leaves a will with bequests for all his children, legitimate and not, listing each of his bastards and their mothers by name, he complicates the lives of many in the village of Ashmead.

One sleepy village

One scandalous will

Four beleaguered heirs

About Book One, The Wayward Son
Sir Robert Benson’s life is in London. He fled Ashmead the day he discovered the man he thought was his father had lied to him, and the girl he loved was beyond his reach. Only a nameless plea from his sister—his half-sister—brings him back to discover he’s been left an estate with a choice piece of land. He will not allow a ludicrous bequest from the earl who sired him turn him into a mockery of landed gentry. When a feisty little termagant with flashing eyes—and a musket—tries to turn Rob off the land—his land—he’s too amused and intrigued to turn away. But the longer he stays, the tighter the bonds that tie him to Ashmead become, strengthened by the powerful draw of the woman rooted on land he’s determined to sell.

Lucy Whitaker’s life is Willowbrook, its land, its tenants, its prosperity, but she always knew it wasn’t hers, knew the missing heir would come eventually. When a powerful man with military bearing rides up looking as if he wants to come in and count the silver, she turns him away, but her heart sinks. She can’t deny Rob Benson his property; she can only try to make him love the place as she does, for her peoples’ sake. A traitorous corner of her heart wishes Rob would love it for her sake.

His life is London and diplomatic intrigue; hers is Ashmead and the land. How can they forge something lasting when they are torn in two directions?

Available on Kindle Unlimited or for purchase on Amazon.

Coming:
October 2021: The Defiant Daughter
January 2022: The Forgotten Daughter
May 2022: The Upright Son

About the Author


Award winning author Caroline Warfield has been many things: traveler, librarian, poet, raiser of children, bird watcher, Internet and Web services manager, conference speaker, indexer, tech writer, genealogist—even a nun. She reckons she is on at least her third act, happily working in an office surrounded by windows where she lets her characters lead her to adventures in England and the far-flung corners of the British Empire. She nudges them to explore the riskiest territory of all, the human heart.

You can find Caroline here:

Website

Facebook

Amazon

Goodreads

Book Bub

Twitter

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

WHY WRITING A BOOK IS LIKE TAKING A ROAD TRIP

By Lucy Mitchell

I’m halfway through writing a book and I can’t help thinking this process feels like a road trip.

Here are the similarities:

Stage 1 – Everything is going to be just fine…

This is the start of the road trip / writing a book. Delusion sets in as . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Lucy Mitchell’s blog

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