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Posts Tagged ‘History Imagined’

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

The Spanish Borderlands: The Mission Trail

By Linda Bennett Pennell

Though it’s dominance of the Borderlands ended long ago, Spain’s influence remains throughout the region. Things as diverse as architecture, clothing, place names, and national parks are testaments to the culture that once held sway from Florida to California. Before there was an Interstate 10 or US 90 connecting the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, there was Old Spanish Trail, an auto route spanning the continent from St. Augustine, Florida to San Diego, California. Begun in 1915, the builders and promoters for OST claimed it followed the route used by the Spanish Conquistadors 400 years earlier. Whether truth or hype, it made for a good story and demonstrates colonial Spain’s reach into the 20th century and beyond. Old Spanish Trail is still a major thoroughfare in the Rice University-University of Houston-Texas Southern University section of Houston.

From its foundational stronghold in present-day Mexico, Spain set her sights north in hopes of finding similar riches to those discovered among the Aztecs, but when . . .

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

The Surveyor in Snowshoes

By Caroline Warfield


Wandering around the great medieval cathedral of St. Magnus in Kirkwall, Scotland I came upon an unusual monument among the 14th century stones and 18th century funerary inscriptions. The life-sized statue depicted a man at rest on the ground, with his hands behind his head, his feet encased in moccasins, with both a book and a weapon at his side. The inscription celebrated John Rae M.D. A doctor? On the ground? Additional honorifics after his name identified him as a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons. I had never heard of the man; I had stumbled upon another one of my colorful Victorians.

It should be no surprise I hadn’t heard of him. While his contemporary and fellow Scotsman, David Livingstone, garnered much greater fame and a memorial in Westminster Abbey, Rae’s contemporaries overlooked his accomplishments. His respect for native peoples earned him little but scorn. Though he died in London, his grave is a quiet corner of the churchyard in Kirkwall.

The statue, as it turned out, made a fitting memorial for a man who lived much of his life out of doors, and whose greatest accomplishments were in. . .

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

When Being Civilized Was Not Enough

February 24, 2017 by Linda Bennett Pennell

War bonnets, teepees, Appaloosa ponies, and a nomadic lifestyle – these are the images that have been promoted of Native Americans living prior to the 20th Century. And for the tribes of the Great Plains and parts of the western US, this was somewhat accurate, but for eastern groups, nothing could have been farther from the truth. The eastern Native . . .

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

Cadillac, Pontiac, Ford, and My Hometown

July 1, 2016 by Caroline Warfield

The story of Detroit, the city where I was born, is, at heart, the story of trade routes, roads, automobiles, and eventually the Saint Lawrence seaway and shipping. It has always been about transportation and commerce, and Americans to this day drive automobiles named after great figures in its history.

On July 24, 1701 Antoine de La Mothe Cadillac went ashore along a stretch of water connecting two of the great lakes with approximately 50 French soldiers and 50 trappers, two French priests, and 100 native companions.

The French . . .

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

Sometimes fact is better than fiction.

Agent 355–A Patriot In Petticoats

June 24, 2016 by Becky Lower

Long before Agent 007 was a germ of an idea in Ian Fleming’s mind, there was Agent 355, one of the first female spies in America, active during the Revolutionary War. But unlike James Bond, Agent 355’s identity is . . .

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

For writers or history buffs. Maybe for both an interesting post.

Pistols for the Uninformed

June 10, 2016 by Caroline Warfield

One of the challenges a writer of historical fiction faces is, of course, describing appropriate items in usage during the time in which the story is set, particularly the kind with which he or she is unfamiliar. Sometimes that extends to weaponry, which . . .

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

The Ohio Firelands

June 3, 2016 by Becky Lower

When I moved back to Ohio after an absence of several decades, I ended up in a part of the state previously unexplored by me, despite having spent the first twenty-two years of my life in Ohio. One of the things I noticed was the constant reference to the Firelands. On nearly every corner in my newly adopted part of the state, there are schools, medical centers, churches, credit unions, a cattle company, grocery stores, retirement centers—all with the Firelands name. I asked people every chance I got what the Firelands was in reference to, but no one had a good explanation.

So, being the historian that I am, I decided to find out. What I didn’t expect was to find was the origin of the name had its roots in . . .

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