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Posts Tagged ‘writing tips’

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Five Top Tips for Maximising your writing time

By Kim Nash

I am thrilled to have author Kim Nash on my blog today. Kim is the author of heartwarming and feel-good fiction. I am halfway through her new book, Moonlight Over Muddleford Cove. Kim’s books are good for the soul. They are uplifting romances with relatable characters and generous spoonfuls of humour. So, please, welcome, Kim Nash.

As a busy Head of Publicity for a publisher, a book blogger, an author, a mom and a dog owner, people often ask me how I find time to get things done. My five top tips for maximising your writing time . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Lucy Mitchell’s blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

SETTINGS and SEASONS

By Writing Instructor Mary Buckham

Writers need to juggle a number of details when creating story from concept to novel ready—plot structure, characterization, point of view, dialogue, pacing and more. So it’s easy to understand how many writers can overlook establishing and maintaining the overall context of where the story is unfolding for the reader.

The more we, as writers, get into a story the easier to overlook what might be missing on the page. Some writers think . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Romancing the Genres blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

For The Love Of…Making People Feel

By Artemis Crow

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” —Maya Angelou

As a writer, this is a goal that I work on every day; making my reader feel. It’s not always easy for me as my writing is fast-paced, action-adventurey, with a large dollop of world mythology and fantasy creatures that I created. That makes for fun reading, but I have to remember that being on the edge of your seat isn’t the only emotion I’m hoping to evoke in my readers. I also want them to laugh and cry and sigh at the ending; a story well told about people they’ve come to care about. With luck, and some continued hard work on my part, the reader will want to continue reading my series through to the end.

But how do we go about accomplishing this you ask? . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Nights of Passion blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

AUTHOR NEWSLETTERS – MY TOP 10 TIPS @EROYALAUTHOR

By Lucy Mitchell and Emily Royal

I have been threatening to do a newsletter for sometime but haven’t felt like I know enough about the subject to whip one up. So, you can imagine my excitement when historical romance author Emily Royal told me she had a guest blog post for me on the subject of newsletters. Now, I am on Emily’s newsletter distribution list and I love them. They’re filled with photos, info on her new books and a lot of Emily Royal book vibes.

This blog post is packed full of Emily’s top 10 tips for newsletters and I am so grateful she’s here today.

Right I know you are keen to read on. . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Lucy Mitchell’s blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

How to be a Good Critique Partner

By Lorraine Ambers

There is nothing more valuable to a writer than a critique partner. It’s a relationship built on mutual respect and trust. Quality feedback elevates a writer to the next level, helping them to see possible blind spots, their strengths, and to pinpoints areas to that might need tightening. It’s important when critiquing that we remember . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Lorraine Ambers’ blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

#IWSG What stops you?

By Marie Andreas

I hope you all had a lovely and safe start to the new year :). Today’s IWSG question is looking on the reader side:

Being a writer, when you’re reading someone else’s work, what stops you from finishing a book/throws you out of the story/frustrates you the most about other people’s books? . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Marie Andreas’ blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

What Will You Do When Your Characters Misbehave?

By Joanne Guidoccio

When I first heard this question at a creative writing workshop, I was tempted to say that I intended to firmly hold onto the reins. A neophyte with no literary credits to my name, I couldn’t imagine characters actually misbehaving on the page. Thankfully, I paused and waited for more seasoned writers to respond.

What followed was . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Joanne’s blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Are You A Real Writer?

By LORENE M.

Seriously, are you? How do we even define what “a real writer” really is? Who says who is a writer and who’s not? Is there an International Organization Of Naming Real Writers or something similar I should know about?

All jokes aside, most of us probably have different views regarding what a real writer is. And this makes me wonder if . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Writing about…Writing blog

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Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Setting The Hook: Book Blurbing for the Reluctant Author

By By Carolan Ivey, “The Blurb Wizard”

My book blurbing career started one summer night over Hurricane cocktails in the French Quarter of New Orleans. But that’s a story for another day. Er, what I remember of it, anyway…

I’ve written a little bit of everything: hard news, short stories, technical documentation, how-to software guides, and advertising/marketing copy. What do all these disparate jobs have in common? The ability to distill complex ideas into appealing, accessible chunks of information.

Are authors good at writing blurbs for their books? In general, the answer is . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Romancing The Genres blog

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Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

The craft of creating a book that has Kodak moments.

photo by C.D. Hersh © 2011

One Christmas season our family visited Krohn Conservatory Trains ,Trestles and Traditions holiday display. It’s amazing what a dedicated group of crafters can do with a bit of glue, flowers, and materials like twigs, moss, and bark that most people would haul to the compost pile. Using these natural materials, crafters created vignettes of Cincinnati landmarks Mt. Adams Incline, Union Terminal, the Conservatory, and international landmarks representing the Eiffel Tower, a European castle, and a Chinese pagoda, all ringed with tracks carrying trains and streetcars through the displays. It took patience and skill to create a little world that that made our family spend half of their visit to the Conservatory in the exhibit taking scads of photos, creating Kodak moments that would take us back to the enchanting display whenever we wanted. We were so captivated that we didn’t want to leave the area.

Reading a good book is a lot like our experience at Krohn Conservatory. When we find a story that transports us, we don’t want the story to end, and we want to revisit that world time and time again. Pearl S. Buck, Laura Ingalls Wilder and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are a few of the writers who provided classic Kodak story moments for us. Debbie Macomber’s town of Cedar Cove has enchanted her readers. Readers love Jan Karon’s character Father Tim from the town of Mitford. And who can forget the world of Harry Potter? J.K Rowling’s stories and characters spurred young readers to devour her books, waiting anxiously for each new book to appear. Plus a whole series of movies and new stars.

As writers we strive to create characters readers will love and locations that readers want to revisit long after the book is closed. Why? Because our job is to write and write well, and because stories that remain in the hearts and memories of our readers are the books that become bestsellers and classics. Who doesn’t want that?

So how can you create stories that will leave your readers wanting more and retuning to your books time and time again? Here are some things we think are key to writing stories readers will love.

  • Get your readers to use their senses. What sounds more interesting? Susan bent toward the rose and inhaled its sweet scent, or Susan bent toward the rose. The peppery scent, with a hint of musk, tickled her nose. If you say the vase of flowers is “lovely” do you know what it looks like? Or does the phrase, Yellow roses, fading to peach at the tips, spilled from the cut-crystal vase, give you a clearer picture?
  • Show don’t tell. A good sentence shows the reader what is happening, revealing emotions and actions without telling the reader what is happening. Jane was angry is telling. A vein pulsed in Jane’s temple and her mouth straightened into a thin, drawn line shows what the anger is doing to Jane. The reader instinctively knows Jane is angry because you have shown her emotions, not told them.
  • Write in active, not passive, voice. The words was, to be, had and words ending in ing are all tip offs to passive writing. Johnny was walking down the street can easily be changed to Johnny walked down the street. Change Shelia had been dusting the hall before breakfast to Sheila dusted the hall before breakfast. Scour your work for passive verbs and eliminate them whenever possible.
  • Avoid stereotypical characters. Show more than one side of your characters. Heroes and heroines have flaws, fatal flaws that can get in the way of their goals, get them deeper in trouble, and keep them from being goody-two-shoes. After all, no human is perfect. Even villains love someone and could be self-sacrificing for that special person. If you have a stereotypical character, try turning him or her around in some way to make them less of a stereotype. Pirates are criminals you wouldn’t want to meet on the high seas, but in spite of his criminal background, you just can’t help rooting for Captain Jack Sparrow. Why do viewers love him? Because he’s a bit of a bumbler and so darned cute. A stereotype turned on its ear.
  • Pay attention to setting. The best writers know their worlds inside out and convey them flawlessly to the reader. Pearl S. Buck brought the foreign world of China to life for a Midwestern teenager. Romance author Jean Johnson created a magical world in her Sons of Destiny series that caused us to collect her entire series. Children (and adults) love the world of Harry Potter because it is magical and different. Popular Amish romances bring the intriguing world of a reclusive religious sect to life for readers. Setting can also be important enough in some stories to be considered a character, so pay attention to the rules of your worlds. There is always a reader who will notice if you break them and they will be disappointed because you didn’t pay attention to details.

Look at the books you have on your “Keep” shelves. How do these five elements play out in them? Now look at your own writing. Are you weak in any of these areas? If so, get out the editing pen and start correcting. With a little work you, too, can create Kodak stories readers will love.

Happy Writing,
C.D. Hersh

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