Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘writing’

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

What Do You Love About Series?

By Karen Witemeyer

Not long ago, in my Facebook group, The Posse, a reader asked me this question:

“When do you begin planning a new series? What is that process like?”

Unlike some authors who have a constant fount of ideas bubbling through their creative centers, I tend to have tunnel vision. I focus on . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Inspired by Life and Fiction blog

Read Full Post »

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Using Life Experiences in Writing

By Pamela Gibson

I often hear “write what you know, draw on your own experiences to provide your characters with actions and emotions.” I suspect, as writers, we do this without even thinking about it.

Six years ago today the greatest adventure of my lifetime came to an end. Here’s what I wrote on that day. . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Soul Mate Publishing Author blog

Read Full Post »

Friday Features’

Guest talks about

Heroines

by

Roni Hall

I love stories about heroes, especially female heroes . . . every day, unsuspecting women who step up when others are in need or in peril. Sometimes it’s superhuman feats, more often mundane. Look around you, they are all around us, but they may not recognize themselves as such.

It may even be you…today or tomorrow.

I was blessed with a strong, spirited mother who covertly instilled strength in me by her daily actions and zest for life. Her four sisters shared her essence and passed it on to their offspring. They were everyday heroes displaying inner strength, perseverance, and selflessness while relishing life and sharing endless love. They did what they had to do expecting no reward.

I lost my mother over twenty years ago but she still inspires me every day and encourages me when times are tough. My adult daughter is strong-willed, independent, and of outstanding moral character. She was named in honor of my mother and I think she inherited more than her name.

The main character, Dani, in Third Man on the Left is a young woman who unfortunately did not have the best environment growing up. Her father was mentally and emotionally abusive causing Dani to be an insecure young woman. After years of her father’s negative upbringing, she believed his claims that she was incompetent and flawed.

As an ER nurse, Dani knew better but took the blame for the death of a toddler patient. To redeem herself, she volunteers for a six-month medical mission to Tanzania. When the mission is savagely attacked, her very survival and that of four others depends solely on her. Her competency is put to the ultimate test.

Many of us don’t know what we are fully capable of until we are tested. We may be surprised by the results, especially if we see others in distress. After years of abuse Dani believed that seeking help from others was a sign of weakness. Trauma can affect how one feels about themself and how they relate to others. Many everyday heroes neglect their own well-being when others are in need.

Being strong doesn’t mean going it alone. Get help, seek assistance and counseling if needed. Especially if like my heroine, Dani, you have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or any type of abuse: physical, emotional, mental, sexual…seek help. There is no shame or stigma in needing or asking for assistance to help you heal. You are not alone. You don’t have to go it alone. Even heroes need help sometime.

Abuse, whether physical, emotional, verbal, or sexual, can have long-term effects on mental health and one’s life. I encourage every victim to get help to heal the physical, mental, and emotional scars of trauma and abuse.

Remember trauma and abuse are never your fault.

“All the best heroes are ordinary people who

make themselves extraordinary.”

-Gerald Way

While you think about that quote here is an excerpt from my new book:

I have nothing left, I can’t go on. Her spirit was finally failing her. She had given it her all. “What now?” she cried out loud. She could feel hysteria closing in.

She had failed them, failed all of them and they would die just like Anna did. It was all up to her and she had let them down. They trusted her, just like Sarah did. Blackness started to encroach and this time she could not escape its mandatory invitation. Though the eternal darkness scared her, she welcomed the finality, the escape from her misery that it provided. She was ready to let go.

Saka’s voice beckoned her back as a small hand tugged at her shoulder.

“No, no, no.” Over and over again was all she could say. She had no more in her. The thought that this was all for nothing was more than her spirit could bear. The child’s hand shook her a little harder pulling her back from her descent into nothingness.

“Miss Dani, look. Look.” Her head, weighted with the suffering of the last few days, was so heavy that Dani had to concentrate on lifting it to see Saka’s face. Eyes wide and questioning, he pointed and Dani’s eyes followed his finger as she raised her head. Through her tears of despair, she detected motion and wearily stood up as she reached for the gun on her waist. All her energy was directed at focusing her vision to identify the movement ahead. Using the back of her hand she wiped the wetness from her eyes.

Figures, men in the distance were staring in their direction, but not approaching. People. Her spirits soared, but then caution reeled her in. Are they rebels? Some of them were dressed in fatigues. Had they figured out the path she had chosen and waited to meet up with them here? She placed her hand on the pistol in her waistband; she could not afford to take chances. Backing up, she reached into the rickshaw for the AK-47 without taking her eyes off the approaching men. Slowly she lifted the lethal weapon firmly into both of her hands and stood in front of the stretcher and the children. Unlocking the safety, she positioned herself for the worst, she would not go down without a fight. Her finger closed in on the trigger.

“Kids, get behind me. Stay back.”

The hairs on the back of her neck stood on end as her eyes tracked the movement of the looming men and her arm muscles tightened. The heavy metal in her arms offered security, but she knew it would only be temporary. For several minutes she observed them as they started toward her. The closer they came, the more her fingers on the gun grew restless. Warily she watched them approach, her mind racing for options. Only moments ago she was ready to give up, but now she had to protect her helpless brood.

Book Blurb
Tragic stories are common in the ER but nurse Dani takes the blame for a toddler patient’s death personally, confirming her abusive father’s belief that she is inept. To prove her competency and redeem herself of overwhelming guilt, she volunteers for a humanitarian mission trip to Tanzania where she can focus on doing good.
Prior to leaving she meets the love of her life, Noah, who says he will wait for her. However, her mission partner/physician, Carter, is a surfer poster boy who has a thing for Dani. Noah’s gut tells him something about the picture-perfect doctor is off but the expedition goes on.
Weeks into her trip the mission is savagely attacked by rebels and Dani is a microsecond too late to prevent her coworker from a devastating injury but saves him from certain death…for now. More rebels are on their way and Dani escapes into the jungle with four lives who are now solely dependent on her for their very survival. The ultimate test of her competency has begun. Was the strike on the mission random or was she an unsuspecting dupe in a smuggling deal gone bad?

Amazon buy link


Author Bio
The summer after high school graduation, Roni worked two jobs to pay for nursing school. During the midnight shift as a waitress, a charismatic young man at the counter flirted with her for hours as he consumed seven cups of coffee. Their first date was eventful enough to be a book itself! Forty years and two kids later, the love story continues. Just like her novels, life can’t be too simple and you must make it an adventurous ride!

Her favorite place to write is in her hammock at their small Michigan cottage where she literally dodges the feeding hummingbirds while being serenaded by the lake’s loons. Besides writing, she loves hiking, biking, and antiquing. The pandemic has taught me to savor time with family and dear friends. Life is too short to sweat the small stuff.

Find Roni on her Web site.

Contact her vial Email.

Read Full Post »

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

It’s the Reading That Matters

By Caroline Warfield

We love them. We hate them. We can’t live without them.

This is on my mind lately because with two new books out at the same time I’ve had a lot of them. They come in two stripes: editorial reviewing services and reader reviews, the kind that land on Amazon or Goodreads with stars from one to five. They have rather different roles.

The quality of an editorial review matters—the more stars and the more raving the text the better. There’s nothing quite like . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

SMP blog

Read Full Post »

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

World Building: Comfort

By Cindy Tomamichel

I expect most of us have a well padded comfort zone these days – the world has become a scarier place, and we have all sought comfort where we can. From our safe place we can read of the discomforts of story book heroes and heroines, enjoying their hardships all the more because they are not ours. But even the most cursed characters need a break!

A thing can provide comfort. When all is darkness, the light of . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Cindy Tomamichel’s blog

Read Full Post »

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

Seven Universal Motivations

By Jenny Schwartz

I hesitated over this title. A motivation is the why of what you want to achieve. It is what drives your actions. In crafting stories, classic plots include the revenge plot or searching for love.

But wind back to the heart of the story . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Jenny Schwartz’s blog

Read Full Post »

Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

Our suggestions to spot “telling” writing in your WIP.

We’ve all heard the admonition “Show, don’t tell.” When we show we are producing better writing that will capture our readers. Showing, instead of telling, lets editors and agents see you are not an amateur.

In spite of hearing the phrase over and over, many writers don’t know how to recognize “telling” writing. Writing that tells analyzes, generalizes, editorializes and summarizes instead of making the writing interactive and sensory for the reader. Naturally, there will be some generalizations and summarization in your writing, but you need to make sure these elements are in the minority, not the majority of your book. You need to show what’s happening so the reader can create in her own mind the picture you, the writer, want to share.

    To locate telling writing look for:
    • Passive sentences. Often passive sentences, especially those with the word was in them, are a tip-off you might be telling instead of showing. The sentence Sally was angry, is telling. Sally’s lips drew down into a thin, taut line, her jaw working side to side, shows us Sally’s anger. We can deduce from the picture that is painted how Sally feels because we know that look.
    • Passages that have very little sensory information. You can tell us the woman smelled good, was sexy, and she knew it, or you can show it by saying John turned to watch her as she strolled between the restaurant tables, her hips swaying like a belly dancer in slow motion. As she neared she tossed her hair behind her shoulder, casting the scent of violets and vanilla in waves toward him. The fragrance made him salivate. Her perfectly manicured nails trailed along his shoulder as she passed by. He shuddered under her touch and she smiled as he looked up at her. Here we know what the woman smells like, how she walks, how John reacts to her and how she reacts to him. Much stronger than just saying she was sexy.
    • “LY” adverbs. ‘LY” adverbs rob sentences of conciseness and force, making your writing weak. Which sounds stronger? The man yelled loudly or The man roared, the sound drowning out the radio. The dog’s tail wagged happily or The dog’s tail wagged in time to his barks as he bounded around the room. The taxi drove very slowly down the street, or The taxi crept at a snail’s pace down the street.

Get the picture? By adding active verbs, sensory information and using fewer “LY” adverbs, you are showing the reader a snapshot of what’s happening.

Here are a few telling phrases. Choose one, or two if you’re ambitious, and see if you can come up with a better picture.

    • skinny lunatic
    • fanatical nun
    • old paper
    • disgruntled employee.
    • frazzled mother.

Share in the comments what you’ve come up with so everyone can see what you created.

Links for our books are on our book page, under the menu at the top of the page or on our Amazon Author Page

Read Full Post »

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

The Writer’s Process

By Deborah Raney

As I dive back into working on a new book to be released next year, I’m going to be sharing about a writer’s process of taking a book from the seed of an idea to an actual book on the shelf. My plan is . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Inspired by Life and Fiction blog

Read Full Post »

Wednesday Special Spotlight

Shines On

suggestions from Us about ways to keep your characters in turmoil!

We recently came across an old email entitled Instructions for Life. The 45 positive recommendations on the list are meant to help make one’s life better. By turning some of the instructions upside down and we created bad life advice that will keep novel characters in turmoil.

Next time things are going too smoothly with your WIP try throwing one of these in the mix.

    1. Let them believe in love at first sight, but fight it like it can’t exist.
    2. If they make a mistake, don’t let them be too quick to acknowledge it.
    3. Let them fall in love deeply, passionately, and with people they would never choose. They might get hurt, but it’s the only way to live life completely.
    4. Make them fight to keep their values, but make sure they do keep them. No one loves an un-heroic hero.
    5. Remember silence is sometimes the best answer and unanswered questions are always suspect.
    6. Let them dredge up the past; it makes for good conflicts.
    7. Let them read between the lines … a lot. Miscommunication thickens the plot.
    8. Let them slowly discover that not getting what they want is sometimes the best thing that ever happened.
    9. Never let them mind their own business. You can’t get in trouble that way.
    10. Remember that great love and great achievements involve great risks, and make them willing to risk everything to get their goals.

Do you have a favorite trick for keeping your characters in turmoil?

Links for our books are on our book page, under the menu at the top of the page or on our Amazon Author Page

Read Full Post »

Tell Again Tuesday

A blog series where we shamelessly share posts from others that we have enjoyed.

 


 

How To Clean a House Like a Writer

By Lucy Mitchell

House cleaning is a useful activity for writers.

The amount of house cleaning a writer does depends on a number of factors: . . .

For the rest of the blog go to:

Lucy Mitchell’s blog

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »